Can PVNS lead to amputation?

PVNS is a benign and destructive disease which results in major symptoms and loss of function leading to amputation [4]. The clinical symptoms are mostly chronic, and years may pass from the first symptoms to medical presentation.

Can PVNS be malignant?

Malignant pigmented villonodular synovitis (PVNS) (or malignant giant cell tumor of tendon sheath (GCTTS) is an extremely rare condition defined as a malignant lesion occurring with concomitant or previously documented PVNS at the same site.

Can PVNS be misdiagnosed?

Since PVNS can mimic many other disease pathologies and often gets misdiagnosed, it may be necessary for patients to seek providers from multiple specialties to come up with the best diagnostic and treatment plan.

Does PVNS return?

Even with treatment, PVNS comes back about half the time. If the pain comes back again and again, radiation therapy may help. Sometimes, the only real remedy comes by completely replacing the joint.

Is PVNS a tumor?

Pigmented villonodular synovitis (PVNS) is a condition that causes the synovium—the thin layer of tissue that lines the joints and tendons—to thicken and overgrow. The mass or tumor that results from this overgrowth is not cancerous and does not spread (metastasize) to other areas of the body.

Is PVNS rare?

Pigmented villonodular synovitis (PVNS) is considered rare. Estimates of prevalence may vary depending on the type of PVNS (localized or diffuse).

Is PVNS serious?

PVNS has been described as a growth or a tumor in the lining of the joint. While it is accurately labeled as a tumor, it is not cancer and it is not typically life-threatening.

Is PVNS curable?

PVNS usually has a good outcome because it is usually not considered an aggressive tumor. It is sometimes completely cured through surgery, although it recurs in about half of all cases.

How long does it take for PVNS to come back?

How long does it take to recover from PVNS surgery? An individual can expect recovery to take a minimum of six weeks; a full recovery may take several months depending on the severity of PVNS disease. Physical therapy is important to regain mobility and strength in surrounding muscles.

Does PVNS show on xray?

PVNS in the knee typically manifests as a non-specific joint effusion on radiographs, although occasionally the fluid may appear dense, a finding suggestive of hemorrhagic effusion.

How long does it take to recover from PVNS surgery?

How serious is PVNS?

However, PVNS is a progressive disease. It slowly worsens and can lead to bone damage and arthritis. PVNS usually affects the knee, although it can affect other joints as well. In most cases, surgery is needed to remove the damaged joint lining and the mass.

What is the recurrence rate of PVNS after surgery?

Localized PVNS rarely recurs after surgery. The recurrence rate for diffuse PVNS is usually around 10%, but can be as high as 30%. Patients with diffuse PVNS will require physician follow-up for several years after surgery. During these visits your doctor may order tests such as an MRI to check for recurrence of PVNS.

How does PVNS affect the knee?

PVNS usually affects the knee, although it can affect other joints as well. In most cases, surgery is needed to remove the damaged joint lining and the mass. In a healthy joint, the synovium produces a small amount of fluid that lubricates the cartilage and aids in movement.

What is the pathophysiology of PVNS?

In some patients with PVNS, a small number of cells in the lining of the affected joint have a defect that makes them produce a protein called colony-stimulating factor 1 receptor (CSF-1R). Research has shown that this protein is involved in PVNS. Localized PVNS causes pain and swelling in the affected joint.

What is PVNS (Pigmented villonodular synovitis)?

Pigmented villonodular synovitis (PVNS) is a condition that causes the synovium—the layer of tissue that lines the joints and tendons—to thicken and overgrow. The mass that results from this overgrowth is not cancerous and does not spread to other areas of the body. Pigmented Villonodular Synovitis – OrthoInfo – AAOS